Category Archives: Health

New cancer center brings treatment close to home 

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Traveling over 100 miles to receive cancer treatments is no longer a worry of patients in Chippewa and Mackinac counties, thanks to a new cancer center in Sault Ste. Marie.

The Cancer Care Center is new to the War Memorial Hospital in Sault Ste. Marie. Continue reading

Michigan’s hospitals rank across the board on safety


A new ranking of the safety of Michigan’s hospitals show most hospitals are passing.

The Leapfrog Group used survey data and information from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to assign each hospital a letter grade.

Out of 80 hospitals in the state, 26 received A’s, 13 B’s, and 37 C’s– that’s 95 percent of all hospitals rated. Three facilities received D’s and one, in Houghton county, in the UP, received an F.
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Health chief: Ebola distracted from Genesee County Legionnaire’s outbreak

flintThe state’s health director says an outbreak of Legionnaire’s disease in Genesee County did not get the attention it deserved from his agency. He says it was partially due to the department’s focus on a different health threat that never materialized.
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Health officials stress infant vaccines on National Infant Immunization Week


Health educators are using National Infant Immunization Week this week to talk about the importance of getting babies vaccinated.

Infants typically receive their first vaccine, which protects against Hepatitis B, at birth. Over the next two years the CDC recommends children receive 24 vaccines to prevent nine serious diseases.

Amanda Thompson is a nursing supervisor at the Health Department of Northwest Michigan. She said it’s also important for adults to keep up with vaccines.

“Those infants can’t get a lot of those vaccines until they’re two, four, six months and they’re not fully vaccinated until they’re older,” Thompson said. “It’s really important for parents and grandparents and anyone who’s around children to also be up-to-date on their vaccinations.”

Most vaccines are for diseases that are unommon in the U.S. Things like polio, measles and meningitis.

Thompson said they are rare because most people have been immunized.

“One of the current challenges that we see is educated young parents and community members who have never seen the effects of these devastating diseases,” Thompson said.

She says if people choose not to get the vaccines they weaken the system making more people vulnerable to more disease.

State legislation could make tampons and pads available for free in schools and gov. buildings

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Legislation introduced in the state house would require schools and government buildings to have feminine hygiene products available free of charge.

Currently, many tampons and pads cost money in bathrooms – or are not available at all.

State Representative Sarah Roberts said it’s unfair women have to feel embarrassed when caught without the products. Continue reading

Bay City follows anti-discrimination ordinance trend

LGBT_flag_02An anti-discrimination ordinance passed unanimously this week in Bay City, and looks similar to ordinances that are popping up in cities and counties across the state.

Some worry these ordinances will affect business. Others say they are essential for inclusive communities.

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MidMichigan Health is hoping to connect medical specialists to rural areas

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MidMichigan Health has received a $500,0000 grant to expand telemedicine services to rural areas.

The funding was provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it will help purchase new technology including an interactive stethoscope and software to connect specialists with rural hospitals. Continue reading

Michigan nurses call for action on safe staffing legislation

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86% of registered nurses say they’re having trouble caring for patients because too many are assigned to them.

That’s according to a survey conducted for the Michigan Nurses Association.

In it, 50% of RN’s surveyed said they have had an unsafe number of patients on at least half of their shifts. Continue reading