A new aquatic invasive plant reaches Michigan waters

Michigan Frog-bit courtesy of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

Michigan Frog-bit courtesy of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

An aquatic invasive plant that has been reported in Ontario, New York, Vermont and other eastern states, has reached Michigan.

European frog-bit has been detected in the Saginaw Bay, Alpena county and in Munuscong Bay in Chippewa County.

The plant creates a dense mat which covers almost the entire open water surface. Frog-bit shades out submerged native plants and reduces invertebrate and plant biodiversity. It also disrupts the natural water flow, and boats are unable to move through the area.

Holly Vaughn, a wildlife technician for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources said, 1,500 pounds of Frog-bit have already been physically removed or been treated with herbicides by the DNR, “ It’s pretty harmful when it get’s to a point where it’s covering the entire water surface and it grows very quickly and forms these mats very quickly. So we wanna get it out of there.”

Vaughn said the DNR doesn’t have a lot of experience with Europea Frog-Bit. She says so far control efforts seem to have been successful.

On The Web
European Frog-Bit Information: www.misin.msu.edu

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