Tag Archives: driving

AAA driving survey shows many drivers admit to running red lights

file0001811854849

The survey reveals that nearly one in three drivers, of all ages, admit to occasionally running red lights.

The survey was conducted by AAA. It found that 69 percent of drivers ages 16 to 18 and those 75 and up engage in risky behaviors.

That includes speeding, texting and driving, and running red lights.

Gary Bubar is with AAA Michigan.

He said 88 percent of young millennials, ages 19 to 24, report bad behaviors while driving.

“What you’ve also found is that you can drive a lot, and get away with a lot without wrecking your car. And so you’re going to do those things. If you got away with it once, the next time it becomes okay too. Its why a lot of people still, even though they know how dangerous it is they still do the kinds of things inside the vehicle that they probably shouldn’t do, and know they shouldn’t do.”

One-third of all drivers report running a red light on occasion.

“So one out of three drivers has run a red light knowingly? and almost one out of two for drivers in age 19-24. That tells me that’s an issue that needs to be addressed.”

Bubar said the study also found young millennial drivers are twice as likely as other drivers to type a text or e-mail on the road.

CMU researchers develop new tool for home rehabilitation

DATSFor people who have lost the ability to drive, getting to a rehabilitation appointment can be daunting.

There’s a new tool aimed at addressing this issue by bringing driving simulations right into the patients home. Continue reading

Experts urge safe driving with extreme cold temperatures

Snow street scenes
It isn’t only snow and ice that can pose risks to Michigan drivers during the winter, but also brutally cold temperatures. When temperatures dip below zero as they have in recent days, Nick Jarmusz, director of public affairs with AAA, said drivers should never hit the road with a tank that’s close to empty.

“Keep at least a half-tank of gas in your car at all times during cold weather to avoid engine freeze-up,” Jarmusz said. “That way, if you do get stranded, you have enough gas to periodically run the engine to keep the car warmed up.”

In addition, Jarmusz said it’s best to check your vehicle’s battery before a cold spell. Faulty batteries cause more car-starting problems than any other factor. He said, at zero degrees, even a good battery has about 35 percent less starting power.

If a car is to break down, state courtesy vans and police are often on the lookout for stranded drivers. If your car freezes up or breaks down, or if you get in a wreck, Jarmusz strongly recommends staying with your vehicle.

“If you start venturing away from your car, the elements are going to be a bigger danger to you than if you were to stay and wait,” he said. “If you’re on a road you can either flag down help or wait for an emergency vehicle. If you have your cell phone, you can call for help.”

Perhaps most importantly, Jarmusz said, is to take precautions before even beginning a drive. When roads are slippery, he said, front-wheel drive and all-wheel drive can help a great deal to get a vehicle going – but once it’s at cruising speed, they do nothing to help you slow down or stop. Also, he said “no” to cruise control on snowy or slippery roads.

“It maintains a specific speed, and if you begin to slide, the vehicle is going to want to keep the wheels spinning at the same rate, in order to maintain the same speed,” says Jarmusz. “What it’s going to do is contribute to loss of control, and if you run into a less-traction situation, the wheels are going to keep spinning.”

If your vehicle has anti-lock brakes, he said applying constant, firm pressure is best to bring the vehicle to a controlled stop under slippery conditions.